MEET THE 2015 ARTPRIZE ARTISTS – PART 4

Tradition and Innovation: Japanese Ceramics Now is an important exhibition for Meijer Gardens in several ways. “It continues our thoughtful examination of Japanese culture initiated with Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan and it furthers our celebration of the opening of The Richard & Helen DeVos Japanese Garden – each remarkable and meaningful events in the history of this organization” said Joseph Becherer, Vice President and Chief Curator.

Below, we introduce you to five more of the artists participating in our 2015 ArtPrize exhibition and their works.

Chika Shiraki – Life – Vote Code 61492
“Life. Being born. Growing. Living. Life. The many things that are born inside of me from hints from these things. A world in which you live in. A world which keeps you alive. A world being born.”

Life by Chika Shiraki

Life by Chika Shiraki

Seika Takahashi – Tea of Spring – Vote Code 62305
“This is the tea pottery I have been making since I was a student. By overlapping and remaking many times they have changed little by little. The feeling I had the first time I saw this tea pottery, bringing its form to reality has become the driving force of the current of my work in pottery. Twisting the lid and body together while the body and the bottom portion of the lid of the pot in the form of a race is this improved version, it is a mechanism so that the lid does not come off. The sugar pot has a mechanism that the pattern of the lid and the body fits and complimented by the spoon. The tea cup and the saucer have become uneven patterns that fit. From the shape is the image the bud of a plant, I put “spring” in the title.”

Tea of Spring by Seika Takahashi

Tea of Spring by Seika Takahashi

Kazuki Takemura – Growing1401 – Vote Code 61063
“In a hemisphere shaped plaster hold I put together parts which I made with the hand forming technique, and created the shape. It is strong against dry air and heat because of the cluster of hexagon shapes and the arch pattern on the cross sections. It is a geometric pattern, but is flexible in making the most of the clay’s organic nature because it was made with the hand forming technique.”

Growing1401 by Kazuki Takemura

Growing1401 by Kazuki Takemura

Yoko Tanaka – Storm -Night- – Vote Code 61675
“I create on the foundational theme of “turning a moment into eternity.” A moment that moved my heart is consumed within me, is replaced with porcelain using soil, believing that perhaps I might thereby be able express sheathed transience and the powerful beauty that is included in the moment. The concept of this work, based on that has to express the powerful beauty of life that wriggle at night. I created a piece with the feeling of the transience of the moment and the power of life of wriggling insects that gather to light on a summer’s evening. It is my hope that those who view this work will feel that moment becomes an eternal moment.”

Swarm -Night- by Yoko Tanaka

Swarm -Night- by Yoko Tanaka

Yutaka Tanaka – Mud Ring Platter – Vote Code 61622
“British old pottery slip ware charmed me as a modern Japanese to produce such a piece in my own sense.”

Mud Ring Platter by Yutaka Tanaka

Mud Ring Platter by Yutaka Tanaka

MEET THE 2015 ARTPRIZE ARTISTS – PART 3

Tradition and Innovation: Japanese Ceramics Now brings together twenty-five of the leading ceramics artists from across Japan. Most of these artists are widely recognized and critically acclaimed in Japan, few have exhibited here in the United States. This exhibition truly is a must see experience here at Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park!

Continuing our series introducing you to the artists who are a part of our 2015 ArtPrize and fall exhibition, here are five more artists to get to know:

Naoto NakataTWINS – for Maple in Minneapolis – Vote Code 61572

TWINS - for Maple in Minneapolis by Naoto Nakata

TWINS – for Maple in Minneapolis by Naoto Nakata

Ado OdaGold and Silver Octagonal Ceramic Box “Bamboo Accent” – Vote Code 61503
“Toubako (a ceramic box) with bamboo design represented in gold and silver colored printed figures (over enamels).”

Gold and Silver Octagonal Ceramic Box "Bamboo Accent" by Ado Oda

Gold and Silver Octagonal Ceramic Box “Bamboo Accent” by Ado Oda

Nobuyuki OgawaPhantom – Vote Code 61018
“With the mental image of a flower as the motif a skeletonized thing was formed.”

Phantom by Nobuyuki Ogawa

Phantom by Nobuyuki Ogawa

Sayaka OishiAccessories – Vote Code 61360
“Whenever I create I always think about the ties between forms and accessories. I also try to make good use of the glaze which is original to ceramics. There are many animal and plant based accessories around the human in my work, but these all represent ‘greed’ and ‘nature’.”

Accessories by Sayaka Oishi

Accessories by Sayaka Oishi

Junji Setsu – Irosuminagashi “Moon Flower” – Vote Code 61791
“I imagined a beautiful picture in which the moonlight lights up the surface of water at night. This piece can also be seen as a flower, which is why I named it “Moon Flower”. The Irosuminagashi technique which I created myself makes it possible to capture one moment in nature. This seems to be connected with the fleeting beauty of life. It was created with the feel of the Japanese concept of beauty and nature. Irosuminagashi was created by myself and nature conversing and coming into harmony, and I think that the appealing part of this technique is that you can never make the same pattern twice.”

Irosuminagashi "Moon Flower" by Junji Setsu

Irosuminagashi “Moon Flower” by Junji Setsu

MEET THE 2015 ARTPRIZE ARTISTS – PART 2

For centuries, functional and decorative ceramic arts in Japan have been appreciated and collected across the globe. In many ways, Japanese ceramics have become iconic references for Japanese culture at large. Tradition and Innovation: Japanese Ceramics Now illustrates that ceramics are a living and expanding tradition, and many of today’s leading artists are highly inventive, exhibiting great creativity in form, content and technique.

Continuing our series introducing you to the artists who are a part of our 2015 ArtPrize and fall exhibition, here are five more artists to get to know:

Yucho Kobayashi – Shigaraki Rippled Large Jar – Vote Code 61968
“As someone who actually makes Shigaraki pottery using the long-standing traditional anagama kiln, I tried to fire an organic large jar with a rippled pattern in an anagama kiln with innovation in mind.”

Shigaraki Rippled Large Jar by Yucho Kobayashi

Shigaraki Rippled Large Jar by Yucho Kobayashi

Atsuko Kubota – Pale-blue Glazed Geometric Patterned Platter – Vote Code 62522
“The geometric pattern of this blue porcelain (pale-blue glaze) platter is a continuous structure of a repeating pattern of squares rotated twice. Over the spread latticework, squares open vertical and horizontal gaps, regularly overlapping, the lattice under the arrangement of the the squares does not overlap at an angle. The process of arranging distinct geometric patterns is the same abstract expression as a music composer. Finding a new geometric effects is a great pleasure. Although such designs are readily expressed in drawing, it is very difficult in pale-blue porcelain.”

Pale-blue Glazed Geometric Patterned Platter by Atsuko Kubota

Pale-blue Glazed Geometric Patterned Platter by Atsuko Kubota

Toru Kurokawa – Garden – Vote Code 61002
“This work was created in a primitive way, with the shape, structure, patterns, and the anagama kiln being brought into effect. I wish for people to rethink their ties with nature, and wonder about their identities as a race.”

Garden by Toru Kurokawa

Garden by Toru Kurokawa

Jun Matsumura – S.S.T.P. – Vote Code 61632
“A super flat era was the background for making the tea pot. This craft evolved alongside lifestyle. In the functional designs that are selected, I incorporate the expression of my modern life in the form.”

S.S.T.P. by Jun Matsumura

S.S.T.P. by Jun Matsumura

Chiyo Nagaoka – First Stage – Vote Code 61432
“Prologue of “the form of the vessel within me” that continues to move without having to stay. Wishes and prayers are pictured as if they are spun with thread.”

First Stage by Chiyo Nagaoka

First Stage by Chiyo Nagaoka

Meet The 2015 ArtPrize Artists – Part 1

Tradition and Innovation: Japanese Ceramics Now is a highly unique exhibition bringing together 25 of the leading ceramics artists from across Japan. Although most are widely recognized and critically acclaimed in their native country, few have exhibited in the United States – making this a must see exhibition experience.

Over the next few weeks, we will be introducing you to the participating artists in their own words and showing you their works. All 25 masters participating in the exhibition are Japanese, making this the first all-national venue in ArtPrize history!

Kunihiro AkinagaMimesis – Vote Code 61089
“I use the bones of animals for my theme – decoration. I form and design the patterns on each bone and copy them on to a paper pattern and create them using the hand forming technique. After firing, I put all of the parts together in a skeletal structure. My image of decorations are the excess decorations of temples and churches – the view of the world between life and death. I also feel that by decorating, the truth of things gets hidden. For example, in our lives the packaging and decoration of our food diverts our attention from the death of animals. By using the concept of decorations you can find modernity even in something universal such as life and death.”

Mimesis by Kunihiro Akinaga

Mimesis by Kunihiro Akinaga

Tadami Hirota – Gold and Silver Colorful Bush Clover Pattern Small Container with Lid – Vote Code 61021
“The bush clover that sways in the wind appears often in “Manyoushuu”. I expressed lovely, beautiful curves in the form of a round container with a lid.”

Gold and Silver Colorful Bush Clover Pattern Small Container with Lid

Gold and Silver Colorful Bush Clover Pattern Small Container with Lid by Tadami Hirota

Masami HosokawaTake A Flight – flying form –  Vote Code 62521
“‘Flying’, ‘swelling’, ‘spreading’, ‘dreams’, ‘hope’, ‘the universe’, ‘infinity’ – I gave one form to all things that are positive.”

Take a Flight - flying form - by Masami Hosokawa

Take a Flight – flying form – by Masami Hosokawa

Tetsuya Ishiyama – Inlaid Colorful Earthenware Pot – Vote Code 61239
“By using an inlaid technique I created a geometric pattern, by which I expressed the stereoscopic effect of overlapping cloths.”

Inlaid Colorful Earthenware Pot by Tetsuya Ishiyama

Inlaid Colorful Earthenware Pot by Tetsuya Ishiyama

Seigo Kaneyuki – Band of Light  – Vote Code 61153
Created by its original technique called “Ligne Hotaru”, it has developed from the traditional Japanese technique “Hotarude”. Its delicate lines of light take us to the other side of everyday life.

Band of Light by Seigo Kaneyuki

Band of Light by Seigo Kaneyuki

 

 

Juror’s Choice, 3-D Finalists

We are honored that three of the artists from our Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors ArtPrize exhibition have been chosen as finalists in the three-dimensional work category by juror Shamim Momin, director of Los Angeles Nomadic Division.

If you have already viewed our ArtPrize exhibition, you might already be familiar with these works. Please consider a second visit to enjoy a closer look at the 16 works that make up Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors. If you haven’t yet been, we invite you to come check out this unique collection of artists. ArtPrize ends on October 12, but Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors will be on display through January 4, 2015.

Alisha Wessler’s From Afar It Is an Island is located in the Snell Gallery.  Composed of more than 100 individual objects, Wessler’s work explores the avenue of possibilities of sculpture through installation. Rather than creating a singular, large-scale piece as the focus of the viewer’s experience, she offers the opportunity to explore dozens of objects as one might encounter them in a museum environment filled with display cases. Each of Wessler’s objects merit consideration in its own right but the sum total of the entire installation creates a profound experience as if encountering remnants of another culture or historical event.

Wessler adds “From Afar It Is an Island pays tribute to designer Bruno Munari’s book of the same title, which explores perception of and possibilities with small objects. ‘Stones are like small worlds,’ reads a caption accompanying a crisp black and white photograph of a stone resembling a speckled planet, ‘If you look at them well, you discover many things: images, stories, strange markings.'”

Wessler holds a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a MFA from the University of Michigan Stamps School of Art & Design. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including Johansson Projects, Oakland, California; MeetFactory, Prague, Czech Republic; Claire Morris Gallery, Ireland; Blütenweiss, Berlin, Germany; G2, Chicago; Gowanus Studio Space, Brooklyn; and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, Ann Arbor. She lives and works in New York City.

Vote for From Afar It Is an Island by using the Vote Code 56457.

From Afar It Is an Island by Alisha Wessler. Vote Code 56457

Alisha Wessler – From Afar It Is an Island. Vote Code 56457

Loris Cecchini’s Wallwave vibration (anatomy of a diagram) is installed in the Balk Gallery. Although work in relief has been a significant to the history of sculpture since the beginning of time, it is infrequently encountered today. Because of its relationship to a wall or façade, relief sculpture is in dialogue with architecture. Here, the artist has created a “tattoo in relief” which appears as a part of the very fabric, or skin, of the wall. Architecture relies on the logic of geometry—primarily linear and planar elements—yet here the artist utilizes the geometry of the sphere in a roughly circular composition. As a result, the sculpture seems to pulsate or vibrate from behind the surface of the wall.

Cecchini states: “In my most recent sculptures, the Wallwave Vibrations series, one loses the element of the object proper. The concern for alteration is concerned more particularly with the physical manifestation of the vibrations, expressed each time with different frequencies and intensities, wherein the visual pattern becomes “echo” of a phenomenon like a succession of waves on a liquid surface. In this direction it is as if the architecture, or a portion of it, is modified by the relationship between the sculpture and the wall.”

Born in Milan, the artist lives and works in Berlin. He has a vast repertoire that, in addition to sculpture, includes photography, drawing and installation work. Regardless of medium, the artist’s overarching concern is for transformation. Cecchini has exhibited internationally including at the Palais de Tokyo and the Museé de Art Moderne, Paris, and MOMA’s PS1 in Brooklyn.

Vote for Wallwave vibration (anatomy of a diagram) by using the Vote Code 57136.

Loris Cecchini: Wallwave vibration (anatomy of a diagram). Vote Code: 57136

Loris Cecchini – Wallwave vibration (anatomy of a diagram). Vote Code: 57136

Osman Khan’s House engages the entire Michigan National Gallery. This work is composed of tubular fluorescent lights that form the framework of a house as a way to discuss the brightness but also the fragility of the American dream.

Osman Khan is an artist interested in constructing artifacts and experiences for social criticism and aesthetic expression. His work plays and subverts the materiality behind themes of identity, communication, economics and public space through participatory and performative installations and site-specific interventions. House is a full-scale gallery installation that references a traditional home but in decidedly minimalist terms. Experiencing the work calls the viewer’s attention to the ideas of the house as an object and form, but more profoundly to a myriad of concepts—from the personal to the communal, the social to the psychological—we each carry about a  house, and by extension, home.

Khan was born in Pakistan and grew up in New York City. He received a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University in New York in 1995. He served as Creative Director for Elliance, a Web development company, until 2002. He completed his MFA at UCLA’s Department of Design, Media Arts, in 2004. He joined the faculty of the School of Art & Design at the University of Michigan as an Assistant Professor in the fall of 2009, where his teaching focuses on sculpture and installation, computational mediums and social practices. He was previously a Visiting Assistant Professor in the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University.

His work has been shown at Shanghai Biennale, Shanghai, China; ZeroOne Festival, San Jose, California; Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit; L.A. Louver, Los Angeles; Witte de With, Centre for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Ars Electronica Center, Linz, Austria; O.K Center for Contemporary Art, Linz, Austria; Socrates Sculpture Park, New York City; SIGGRAPH, San Diego, California; Bank, Los Angeles; telic, Los Angeles. He is a recipient of an Art Matters grant, Ars Electronica’s Prix Ars Award of Distinction and The Arctic Circle 2009 Residency. Articles about his work have appeared in Artforum, Artweek, Art Review, I.D., LA Times, The Wall Street Journal and Artnet.

Vote for House by using the Vote Code 56655.

Osman Khan - House. Vote Code: 56655

Osman Khan – House. Vote Code: 56655

Joseph Becherer’s ArtPrize Venue Reviews

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Our very own Chief Curator and Vice President for Collections and Exhibitions Joseph Becherer is once again writing about ArtPrize and reviewing nine of the major ArtPrize venues for The Grand Rapids Press.

Below are links to those articles and reviews. Visit MLive’s coverage of ArtPrize to see their complete coverage of ArtPrize 2014.

ArtPrize jurors show their respect for Grand Rapids with Shortlist

ArtPrize 2014 may be just what the doctor (and patients) ordered.

Dana Lynn Harper works on her ArtPrize entry "Bloom Bloom" outside the Grand Rapids Downtown Market Monday, Sept. 22, 2014. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

Dana Lynn Harper works on her ArtPrize entry “Bloom Bloom” outside the Grand Rapids Downtown Market Monday, Sept. 22, 2014. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

 

Meijer Gardens invites sculptors to select emerging works in ‘Highly Recommended’

Loris Cecchini's 'Wallwave Vibration' is one of the sixteen works featured in Meijer Gardens' ArtPrize exhibition, 'Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors.' Carrie Westra of the Meijer Gardens staff applies paint Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

Loris Cecchini’s ‘Wallwave Vibration’ is one of the sixteen works featured in Meijer Gardens’ ArtPrize exhibition, ‘Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors.’ Carrie Westra of the Meijer Gardens staff applies paint Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

 

Grand Rapids Art Museum enters ‘[Dis]Comfort Zones’

Anila Quayyum Agha's "Intersections" as part of an ArtPrize 2014 media preview at the Grand Rapids Art Museum Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The GRAM will be showcasing 19 ArtPrize artists. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

Anila Quayyum Agha’s “Intersections” as part of an ArtPrize 2014 media preview at the Grand Rapids Art Museum Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The GRAM will be showcasing 19 ArtPrize artists. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

 

UICA’s ‘Collaboration’ is diverse, engaging

"Bio Interloper" created by Crystal Wagner is a large-scale site-specific installation made using everyday materials like birthday party table cloth, cut paper, and chicken wire in combination with layered screen prints. The piece explores ideas related to human beings and the increasingly severe divide between themselves and the natural world by growing, as if it were a life form, through the gallery. The ArtPrize piece is on display at UICA in Grand Rapids, Mich., September 15, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

“Bio Interloper” created by Crystal Wagner is a large-scale site-specific installation made using everyday materials like birthday party table cloth, cut paper, and chicken wire in combination with layered screen prints. The piece explores ideas related to human beings and the increasingly severe divide between themselves and the natural world by growing, as if it were a life form, through the gallery. The ArtPrize piece is on display at UICA in Grand Rapids, Mich., September 15, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

 

Ford Museum presents technically impressive works

ArtPrize entry 'kNights Watch' by artist Justin La Doux can be seen at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

ArtPrize entry ‘kNights Watch’ by artist Justin La Doux can be seen at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

 

Women’s City Club collection is intimate, thoughtful

ArtPrize entry by Grand Rapids resident David Dodde is a portrait of his father who passed in 2013. The artist used silver and his father's ashes to create the image that was screen printed by hand. The piece can be seen displayed at the Women's City Club. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

ArtPrize entry by Grand Rapids resident David Dodde is a portrait of his father who passed in 2013. The artist used silver and his father’s ashes to create the image that was screen printed by hand. The piece can be seen displayed at the Women’s City Club. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

 

Cathedral Square hosts calm, peaceful experience

"Urban Tumbleweed" created by Nathan Lareau is one of the ArtPrize entries hosted at Cathedral Square (360 Division Ave. S.), Grand Rapids, Mich., September 23, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

“Urban Tumbleweed” created by Nathan Lareau is one of the ArtPrize entries hosted at Cathedral Square (360 Division Ave. S.), Grand Rapids, Mich., September 23, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

 

Site:Lab @ Morton is passport to global art world

Ryan Roa, second from left, talks about his ArtPrize installation "Space Drawings" at the SiTE:LAB @ The Morton exhibition will feature live performance. Photo taken in downtown Grand Rapids, Mich. Tuesday, September 23, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

Ryan Roa, second from left, talks about his ArtPrize installation “Space Drawings” at the SiTE:LAB @ The Morton exhibition will feature live performance. Photo taken in downtown Grand Rapids, Mich. Tuesday, September 23, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

 

Kendall College exhibit explores money and art

Annie Krempa and Patrick Bradley look at Steve Lambert's ArtPrize entry "Capitalism Works For Me" at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. "I like that it's interactive," said Krempa about the entry. Krempa and Bradley are from Traverse City. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

Annie Krempa and Patrick Bradley look at Steve Lambert’s ArtPrize entry “Capitalism Works For Me” at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. “I like that it’s interactive,” said Krempa about the entry. Krempa and Bradley are from Traverse City. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

 

Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors – Meet The Artists, Part 2

Fall means ArtPrize, and with that comes a new sculpture exhibition opening at Meijer Gardens. This year’s exhibition, Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors, features 16 artists and also serves as our fall exhibition, running from September 19, 2014 through January 4, 2015.

Meijer Gardens maintains a close relationship with artists in our permanent collection and relied on their recommendations of new and upcoming sculptors to form this group exhibition.

Meet the rest of our participating artists below, and see our Meet The Artists Part 1 blog post to read up on the other artists that are participating in Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors.

Osman Khan

Osman Khan was born in Pakistan and grew up in New York City. He received a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University in New York in 1995.  He is an artist interested in constructing artifacts and experiences for social criticism and aesthetic expression. His work plays and subverts the materiality behind themes of identity, communication, economics and public space through participatory & performative installations and site-specific interventions.

Osman Khan

House by Osman Khan. Vote Code: 56655

Sean Paul Lorentz

Born in Petaluma, California, Sean Paul Lorentz lives and works in the San Francisco Bay area and is the West Coast Studio Manager for sculptor Mark di Suvero. He graduated in 2006 with a Bachelor of Arts at Studio Art University of California. His work is the product of an instinctive process involving personal experience and the perpetual development of skills within the mediums of life and steel.

 

Bogie by Sean Paul Lorentz. Vote Code: 57577

Bogie by Sean Paul Lorentz. Vote Code: 57577

Alyson Shotz

A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and the University of Washington, Seattle, Alyson Shotz has upcoming solo exhibitions at Millesgarden Museum, Stockholm, Sweden, and the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum and Hamilton College, Clinton, NY. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, NY, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art among others.

Spiral Helix by Alyson Shotz. Vote Code: 56209

Spiral Helix by Alyson Shotz. Vote Code: 56209

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom Price

Tom Price (b. London, UK, 1981) studied at Chelsea College of Art (2001-2004) and received a MA at the Royal College of Art, Sculpture School (2004-2006). In 2009 he was featured alongside Grayson Perry, Michael Landy, Sir Anthony Caro and Cornelia Parker on the BBC 4 television documentary, Where is Modern Art Now?, presented by Gus Casely-Hayford. In 2010 he featured on BBC 4’s, How to Get a Head in Sculpture, also featuring Marc Quinn and Sir Anthony Caro.

Network by Tom Price. Vote Code 57469

Network by Tom Price. Vote Code 57469

Daniel Silver

 

 

 

 

 

Born in London in 1972, Daniel Silver was raised in Jerusalem and moved back to London in 1994. He has exhibited extensively across the UK and internationally. He holds a BA of Fine Art from Slade School of Art and an MA of Fine Art Sculpture from the Royal College of Art.

 

 

Untitled by Daniel Silver. Vote Code: 56854

Untitled by Daniel Silver. Vote Code: 56854

Alisha Wessler

 

 

Alisha Wessler lives and works in New York City. She holds a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a MFA from the University of Michigan Stamps School of Art & Design. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including Johansson Projects (Oakland), MeetFactory (Prague), Claire Morris Gallery (Ireland), Blütenweiss (Berlin), G2 (Chicago), Gowanus Studio Space (Brooklyn) and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology (Ann Arbor).

From Afar It Is an Island by Alisha Wessler. Vote Code 56457

From Afar It Is an Island by Alisha Wessler. Vote Code 56457

Christopher Yockey

Christopher Yockey was raised in Royal Oak, Michigan. He has a MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art, and in addition to his own work, works with sculptor Mark di Suvero. He is also an avid hockey player, living in New York City with his wife and daughter.

You Have Options by Christopher Yockey. Vote Code 56621

You Have Options by Christopher Yockey. Vote Code 56621

Antonella Zazzera

 

 

Antonella Zazzera lives and works in Todi, Italy. She completed her studies with a degree in painting at the Pietro Vannucci Academy in Perugia in 1999. Over the years, she has deepened her knowledge of Italian Art and the recovery of its values: Sign, Light and Space. Always faithful to her first intuition, her current work of sculpture is the result of a process which springs from photographic researches leading her to focus the importance of Light in the definition of both Space and Form.

Armonico CLXVII by Antonella Zazzera. Vote Code 56891

Armonico CLXVII by Antonella Zazzera. Vote Code 56891