Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan Exhibition Spotlight- Spring

Throughout the course of Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan, we’ll be featuring some of our favorite works of art from the exhibition and providing a more in-depth look at some of our favorite pieces.

This week we’re featuring three remarkable pieces from Phase Two of the collection, which will be on display March 28-June 4, and is devoted to themes of spring:

Kitchen model

This meticulous work is on loan from the Museum of Omihachiman City—Grand Rapids’ Sister City in the Shiga Prefecture. It is a perfect scale model of a traditional Japanese kitchen and its wide range of instruments and utensils. Originally, it would have been commissioned by a wealthy merchant family for young children. More than simply a toy, it would have been essential to their success in future life. Note the complete mastery of numerous materials in wood, metal and ceramic, which replicate everyday objects in minute detail.

Miniature kitchen model
Shōwa Period, 20th Century
Wood, material, stoneware
Collection of Omihachiman City
Courtesy of The Museum of Omihachiman City

Koto Ware

Koto Ware, a highly refined form of ceramics from Shiga Prefecture, flourished in 19th century. The kiln where this nest box was created opened in 1842 in the city of Hikone, and produced luxury items until 1862. The delicacy and decoration of Koto Ware was the antithesis to the irregular shape and earthy colors and textures of Shigaraki pottery.

This multi-tiered stackable box was meticulously made and decorated by hand. The square shape and flat bottoms of each level would have been difficult to create and could only have been produced by an artist of the highest skill. It originally functioned as a type of luxury lunch box perhaps given as a royal gift and used only for special guests.

The namesake decorative elements of the peacock and peony are found across the exterior. Such forms were undoubtedly influenced by the art of China. So too, the use of porcelain with blue underglaze also evidences an interest in Chinese art and pottery.

Koto Ware, Nest of boxes with peacock and peony
Edo Period, 19th Century
Porcelain with blue underglaze
The Museum of Shiga Prefecture, Biwako-Bunkakan

Dainnichi Nyorai

This figure represents the central deity of Esoteric Buddhism. Simply put, he represents the Supreme Buddha seated atop the iconic lotus flower. Traces of gold leaf can be found across the surface of the cast bronze figure suggesting the prominence of the sculpture. An extremely rare loan from the Binman-ji Temple, this sculpture is among the oldest objects on display in this exhibition. Located in the rural city of Taga Town, this temple was one of the most visited and prosperous temples of medieval Japan (13th-16th century).

The firmly seated position and contemplative demeanor are iconic for Buddhist statuary. Although the body and floral form are decidedly iconic, there is a strong vertical structure to this composition. One can easily follow a visual central core that stretches from the conical headdress through the torso of the figure down to the pedestal upon which the Buddha rests. Such a strong central core grants the illusion of monumentality to the sculpture.

Dainichi Nyorai

Kamakura Period, 13th Century
Cast bronze
Collection of the Preservation Meeting of Binman-ji Temple’s Historic Relics and Culture
Courtesy of the Museum of Taga Town

Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan Exhibition Spotlight – Sculpture

Throughout the course of Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan, we’ll be featuring some of our favorite works of art from the exhibition and providing a more in-depth look at some of these pieces.

This week, we’re featuring two pieces of sculpture from the collection:

Buddha at Birth

This rare sculpture from the 8th century describes the infant Buddha. According to tradition, the infant took seven steps from his mother, pointed to the heavens and declared he was venerable on both heaven and earth while under his feet lotus flowers bloomed. The sculpture describes a very young figure pointing to the heavens with his right hand and to the earth with his left hand; beneath his feet is a stylized representation of a lotus flower. Figures such as this were placed on display at festivals celebrating the Buddha’s birth on April 8. Then, it would have been surrounded by flowers and sweet tea poured over the figure. The latter possibly accounts for the surface colors seen today.  On loan from the Daiko-ji Temple, it is one of several Buddhist devotional figures and accessories which will be on display over the course of the exhibition.

Buddha at Birth
Nara Period, 8th Century
Cast bronze
Collection of Daiko-ji Temple
Courtesy of The Museum of Shiga Prefecture, Biwako-Bunkakan

Seated Senju Kannon

The ancient bronze shown above,Seated Senju Kannon, is on loan through the Kannon-ji Temple located on the shores of Lake Biwa in the center of the Shiga Prefecture. It represents the God of Mercy who, according to Buddhist beliefs, has the highest rank after the Buddha himself. The figure is described with multiple arms at his sides and multiple heads atop his head symbolizing a thousand armed and a thousand eyed deity capable of managing everything in the universe and able to save all situations in the world. A subject of great devotion, this deity also appears frequently in traditional paintings from the 16th through the 18th centuries. Careful observation of this bronze form reveals traces of gold leaf indicating the sculpture was at one time completely gilded. This is another of the several Buddhist devotional figures and accessories that will be on display over the course of the exhibition.

Seated Senju Kannon
Edo Period, 17th Century
Cast bronze
Collection of the Kannon-ji Temple
Courtesy of The Museum of Shiga Prefecture, Biwako-Bunkakan

Click HERE to learn more about our Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan exhibition.

Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan – Exhibition Spotlight

Throughout the course of Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan, we’ll be featuring some of our favorite works of art from the exhibition and providing a more in-depth look at some of our favorite pieces.

This week, we’re featuring three bowls from the collection:

Shigaraki Ware, Tea Bowl Asanikeni by Ueda Naokata

This tea bowl was made by Ueda Naokato who is a specialist in tea ceremony ceramics. A leading master of the famed Shigaraki pottery, he is the fifth generation of his family to work in this tradition and is revered as a Shiga Prefectural Intangible Asset or Treasure. The earthen colors, highly textured surfaces and slightly irregular form epitomize the Shigaraki tradition. This vessel was made on a hand-propelled wheel and in a wood-fired kiln. The fingerprints seen on the interior base of this bowl are intentional. Works by Naokato have also been commissioned for use in the teahouse in the Richard and Helen DeVos Japanese Garden. This particular vessel will be on display over the entirety of the exhibition.

Shigaraki Ware, Tea Bowl Asanikeni
Ueda Naokata (born 1927)
Shōwa Period, 1964
Stoneware
Courtesy of Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park

Shigaraki Ware, Lozenge-styled vase with natural firing effect by Takahashi Shunsai

This vessel was made by Takahashi Shunsai, a specialist in ceramic vases and jars. Part of a family of potters, he is celebrated as a Shiga Prefectural Intangible Asset or Treasure. Although he initially follows traditional shapes, he has experimented with forms, firing techniques and natural glazes as a means of bringing the history of Shigaraki pottery into the modern age. The carefully marked glaze decoration on this vessel has not been painted, but results from the chemical reaction of wood ash across the surface of the clay and the controlled movement of air in the firing process. This particular vessel will be on display over the course of the exhibition.

Shigaraki Ware, Lozenge-styled vase with natural firing effect
Takahashi Shunsai (1927–2011)
Heisei Period, 1997
Stoneware
Courtesy of Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park

Large crazed celadon bowl by Shimizu Uichi

Born into a family of potters in Kyoto, Shimizu Uichi was declared a Living National Treasure by the Japanese Government over the course of his extensive career.  He established a studio on the shores of Lake Biwa near the Shiga Prefectural Capital of Otsu in the 1970s. He is known for using clay from the site, which contains many fossils and shells, and for experimenting with iron glazing. The color, translucent quality and overall crackling effect epitomize his most celebrated works. Such crackling effects result from a carefully controlled cooling process for which the artist is most well known. This work of art will also be on display over the entire course of the exhibition.

Large crazed celadon bowl
Shimizu Uichi (1926–2004)
Shōwa Period, 1975
Stoneware with overglaze
Courtesy of Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park

Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan Exhibition Preview

Opening to the public on Friday, January 30, Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan is a unique partnership between Meijer Gardens and Shiga, Michigan’s sister state in Japan. The artistic and cultural traditions of Shiga Prefecture are among the most distinguished and profound in Japan.

Shiga

This exhibition will display more than 75 historical works of Japanese art aging back to the 8th century. Shigaraki pottery, delicate scrolls, screens, kimono, and works on paper and wood will all be on display and will change every two months through August. Changing the works on display allows protection of the artifacts as well as a new experience for our visitors throughout the winter, spring and summer.

Most of these rare works of art have never been seen outside of Japan, and this collection will not be on display anywhere else in the world. Many of the works are regional and national treasures! This exhibition highlights masterworks from the collections of: Museum of Shiga Perfecture, Biwako, Bunkakan; Museum of Modern Art, Shiga; Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park; and Omihachiman City Museums.  Additional works will be on loan from Daiko-ji Temple, Binmanjii Shiseki Bunka Hoshokaii, Taga City Museum, Kannon-ji Temple, Hando Shrine, and Saimyo-ji Temple.

Building on the more than 40-year sister-state relationship between the Shiga Prefecture and the State of Michigan, Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan will reflect on and celebrate the cultural richness of Japan in anticipation of the opening of The Richard & Helen DeVos Japanese Garden in June. All works shown have been selected by a joint committee of Shiga’s museum and state government officials along with experts from Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park.

Over the next few months, we will be sharing more in-depth information about the exhibition and the works of art that will be on display.

The “winter” portion of Splendors of Shiga: Treasures from Japan will run from January 30—March 22. The exhibition will be temporarily closed from March 23-27 in order to change the artifacts that are on display. The spring display opens on March 28 and will run through June 4. We hope that you can join us for this wonderful and once-in-a-lifetime exhibition!

Joseph Becherer’s ArtPrize Venue Reviews

GR-Store_ArtPrize_Store_Banner-1136x300

Our very own Chief Curator and Vice President for Collections and Exhibitions Joseph Becherer is once again writing about ArtPrize and reviewing nine of the major ArtPrize venues for The Grand Rapids Press.

Below are links to those articles and reviews. Visit MLive’s coverage of ArtPrize to see their complete coverage of ArtPrize 2014.

ArtPrize jurors show their respect for Grand Rapids with Shortlist

ArtPrize 2014 may be just what the doctor (and patients) ordered.

Dana Lynn Harper works on her ArtPrize entry "Bloom Bloom" outside the Grand Rapids Downtown Market Monday, Sept. 22, 2014. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

Dana Lynn Harper works on her ArtPrize entry “Bloom Bloom” outside the Grand Rapids Downtown Market Monday, Sept. 22, 2014. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

 

Meijer Gardens invites sculptors to select emerging works in ‘Highly Recommended’

Loris Cecchini's 'Wallwave Vibration' is one of the sixteen works featured in Meijer Gardens' ArtPrize exhibition, 'Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors.' Carrie Westra of the Meijer Gardens staff applies paint Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

Loris Cecchini’s ‘Wallwave Vibration’ is one of the sixteen works featured in Meijer Gardens’ ArtPrize exhibition, ‘Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors.’ Carrie Westra of the Meijer Gardens staff applies paint Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

 

Grand Rapids Art Museum enters ‘[Dis]Comfort Zones’

Anila Quayyum Agha's "Intersections" as part of an ArtPrize 2014 media preview at the Grand Rapids Art Museum Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The GRAM will be showcasing 19 ArtPrize artists. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

Anila Quayyum Agha’s “Intersections” as part of an ArtPrize 2014 media preview at the Grand Rapids Art Museum Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. The GRAM will be showcasing 19 ArtPrize artists. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

 

UICA’s ‘Collaboration’ is diverse, engaging

"Bio Interloper" created by Crystal Wagner is a large-scale site-specific installation made using everyday materials like birthday party table cloth, cut paper, and chicken wire in combination with layered screen prints. The piece explores ideas related to human beings and the increasingly severe divide between themselves and the natural world by growing, as if it were a life form, through the gallery. The ArtPrize piece is on display at UICA in Grand Rapids, Mich., September 15, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

“Bio Interloper” created by Crystal Wagner is a large-scale site-specific installation made using everyday materials like birthday party table cloth, cut paper, and chicken wire in combination with layered screen prints. The piece explores ideas related to human beings and the increasingly severe divide between themselves and the natural world by growing, as if it were a life form, through the gallery. The ArtPrize piece is on display at UICA in Grand Rapids, Mich., September 15, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

 

Ford Museum presents technically impressive works

ArtPrize entry 'kNights Watch' by artist Justin La Doux can be seen at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

ArtPrize entry ‘kNights Watch’ by artist Justin La Doux can be seen at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

 

Women’s City Club collection is intimate, thoughtful

ArtPrize entry by Grand Rapids resident David Dodde is a portrait of his father who passed in 2013. The artist used silver and his father's ashes to create the image that was screen printed by hand. The piece can be seen displayed at the Women's City Club. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

ArtPrize entry by Grand Rapids resident David Dodde is a portrait of his father who passed in 2013. The artist used silver and his father’s ashes to create the image that was screen printed by hand. The piece can be seen displayed at the Women’s City Club. (Emily Rose Bennett | MLive.com)

 

Cathedral Square hosts calm, peaceful experience

"Urban Tumbleweed" created by Nathan Lareau is one of the ArtPrize entries hosted at Cathedral Square (360 Division Ave. S.), Grand Rapids, Mich., September 23, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

“Urban Tumbleweed” created by Nathan Lareau is one of the ArtPrize entries hosted at Cathedral Square (360 Division Ave. S.), Grand Rapids, Mich., September 23, 2014. (Joel Bissell | MLive.com)

 

Site:Lab @ Morton is passport to global art world

Ryan Roa, second from left, talks about his ArtPrize installation "Space Drawings" at the SiTE:LAB @ The Morton exhibition will feature live performance. Photo taken in downtown Grand Rapids, Mich. Tuesday, September 23, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

Ryan Roa, second from left, talks about his ArtPrize installation “Space Drawings” at the SiTE:LAB @ The Morton exhibition will feature live performance. Photo taken in downtown Grand Rapids, Mich. Tuesday, September 23, 2014. (Chris Clark | MLive.com)

 

Kendall College exhibit explores money and art

Annie Krempa and Patrick Bradley look at Steve Lambert's ArtPrize entry "Capitalism Works For Me" at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. "I like that it's interactive," said Krempa about the entry. Krempa and Bradley are from Traverse City. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

Annie Krempa and Patrick Bradley look at Steve Lambert’s ArtPrize entry “Capitalism Works For Me” at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. “I like that it’s interactive,” said Krempa about the entry. Krempa and Bradley are from Traverse City. (Cory Morse | MLive.com)

 

Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors – Meet The Artists, Part 2

Fall means ArtPrize, and with that comes a new sculpture exhibition opening at Meijer Gardens. This year’s exhibition, Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors, features 16 artists and also serves as our fall exhibition, running from September 19, 2014 through January 4, 2015.

Meijer Gardens maintains a close relationship with artists in our permanent collection and relied on their recommendations of new and upcoming sculptors to form this group exhibition.

Meet the rest of our participating artists below, and see our Meet The Artists Part 1 blog post to read up on the other artists that are participating in Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors.

Osman Khan

Osman Khan was born in Pakistan and grew up in New York City. He received a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Columbia University in New York in 1995.  He is an artist interested in constructing artifacts and experiences for social criticism and aesthetic expression. His work plays and subverts the materiality behind themes of identity, communication, economics and public space through participatory & performative installations and site-specific interventions.

Osman Khan

House by Osman Khan. Vote Code: 56655

Sean Paul Lorentz

Born in Petaluma, California, Sean Paul Lorentz lives and works in the San Francisco Bay area and is the West Coast Studio Manager for sculptor Mark di Suvero. He graduated in 2006 with a Bachelor of Arts at Studio Art University of California. His work is the product of an instinctive process involving personal experience and the perpetual development of skills within the mediums of life and steel.

 

Bogie by Sean Paul Lorentz. Vote Code: 57577

Bogie by Sean Paul Lorentz. Vote Code: 57577

Alyson Shotz

A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and the University of Washington, Seattle, Alyson Shotz has upcoming solo exhibitions at Millesgarden Museum, Stockholm, Sweden, and the Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum and Hamilton College, Clinton, NY. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, NY, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art among others.

Spiral Helix by Alyson Shotz. Vote Code: 56209

Spiral Helix by Alyson Shotz. Vote Code: 56209

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom Price

Tom Price (b. London, UK, 1981) studied at Chelsea College of Art (2001-2004) and received a MA at the Royal College of Art, Sculpture School (2004-2006). In 2009 he was featured alongside Grayson Perry, Michael Landy, Sir Anthony Caro and Cornelia Parker on the BBC 4 television documentary, Where is Modern Art Now?, presented by Gus Casely-Hayford. In 2010 he featured on BBC 4’s, How to Get a Head in Sculpture, also featuring Marc Quinn and Sir Anthony Caro.

Network by Tom Price. Vote Code 57469

Network by Tom Price. Vote Code 57469

Daniel Silver

 

 

 

 

 

Born in London in 1972, Daniel Silver was raised in Jerusalem and moved back to London in 1994. He has exhibited extensively across the UK and internationally. He holds a BA of Fine Art from Slade School of Art and an MA of Fine Art Sculpture from the Royal College of Art.

 

 

Untitled by Daniel Silver. Vote Code: 56854

Untitled by Daniel Silver. Vote Code: 56854

Alisha Wessler

 

 

Alisha Wessler lives and works in New York City. She holds a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a MFA from the University of Michigan Stamps School of Art & Design. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including Johansson Projects (Oakland), MeetFactory (Prague), Claire Morris Gallery (Ireland), Blütenweiss (Berlin), G2 (Chicago), Gowanus Studio Space (Brooklyn) and the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology (Ann Arbor).

From Afar It Is an Island by Alisha Wessler. Vote Code 56457

From Afar It Is an Island by Alisha Wessler. Vote Code 56457

Christopher Yockey

Christopher Yockey was raised in Royal Oak, Michigan. He has a MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art, and in addition to his own work, works with sculptor Mark di Suvero. He is also an avid hockey player, living in New York City with his wife and daughter.

You Have Options by Christopher Yockey. Vote Code 56621

You Have Options by Christopher Yockey. Vote Code 56621

Antonella Zazzera

 

 

Antonella Zazzera lives and works in Todi, Italy. She completed her studies with a degree in painting at the Pietro Vannucci Academy in Perugia in 1999. Over the years, she has deepened her knowledge of Italian Art and the recovery of its values: Sign, Light and Space. Always faithful to her first intuition, her current work of sculpture is the result of a process which springs from photographic researches leading her to focus the importance of Light in the definition of both Space and Form.

Armonico CLXVII by Antonella Zazzera. Vote Code 56891

Armonico CLXVII by Antonella Zazzera. Vote Code 56891

Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors – Meet The Artists, Part 1

It’s almost time for ArtPrize, and that means a new sculpture exhibition is opening at Meijer Gardens. This year’s exhibition, Highly Recommended: Emerging Sculptors, features 16 artists and also serves as our fall exhibition, running from September 19, 2014 through January 4, 2015.

Meijer Gardens maintains a close relationship with artists in our permanent collection and relied on their recommendations of new and upcoming sculptors to form this group exhibition.

Meet some of the participating artists below:

Katrin Albrecht

Katrin Albrecht is an artist from Germany. She began her career as a tailor, and then studied fashion design in Berlin before finding her field in Fine Arts and studying sculpture at Weissensse School of Art in Berlin, Städelschule Frankfurt, and Ecole Des Beaux-Arts, Paris. She also received an MA from Goldsmiths College in London. Her work has been exhibited widely and she has received several awards such as the Chelsea Arts Club Award with Berta Koch Collective in 2013.

Katrin Albrecht: Die Hutte Brennt / The Shed is on Fire. Vote Code: 57284

Katrin Albrecht: Die Hutte Brennt / The Shed is on Fire. Vote Code: 57284

Armen Agop

Armen Agop was born in Cairo, graduated from Helwan University, and first came to Italy in 2000 after winning the Prix de Rome. In 2008 he was awarded “The Sculpture Grant” given once a year to a prominent international sculptor by the Swedish organization KKV-B. In 2010, he received the international Umberto Mastroianni award in Piemonte, Italy.

Armen Agop: Untitled. Vote Code: 56385

Loris Cecchini

Loris Cecchini was born in Milan in 1969 and lives and works between Berlin and Tuscany. He has shown his work all over the world with solo exhibitions in prestigious museums such as the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Loris Cecchini has also taken part in international exhibitions and numerous collective shows including the 49th and 13th Quadrennial of Rome.

Loris Cecchini: Wallwave vibration (anatomy of a diagram). Vote Code: 57136

Loris Cecchini: Wallwave vibration (anatomy of a diagram). Vote Code: 57136

Mat Chivers

The work of British visual artist Mat Chivers looks at how the fundamental phenomena that exist below the surface of things inform the way we experience the world around us. The process of making draws on combinations of analogue and digital technologies in works that embody a hybridisation of old-world subjects and techniques with contemporary envisioning processes. His practice focuses at the location between data capture and its consequent interpretation in order to explore the ambiguous nature of perception.

Mat Chivers

Mat Chivers: Chain of Events. Vote Code: 56263

Michele Ciribifera

Michele Ciribifera, born in Perugia in 1969, graduated in sculpture with Edgardo Abbozzo, at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Perugia in 1991. In 1993 he won the first prize at the sculpture symposium in S. Elena (CA), and in 1997 he exhibited on the first solo show in Sansepolcro (AR), a series of sculptures in which are present the structural tensions of elements directly drawn from natural context. In the match between reality and illusion, the sculptures of Michele Ciribifera define the mysterious interaction between energy and matter.

Michele Ciribifera: Double ondAnoma. Vote Code: 56946

Michele Ciribifera: Double ondAnoma. Vote Code: 56946

Chiara Dynys

Chiara Dynys was born in Mantua. Her works have become more site specific and, one might say, are developed in the perception of users that, coming across them, find themselves “different” and altered, rediscovering the feeling of their presence. “I often use the word passage to talk about my work. In fact, what is common to all my work is the sense of the crossing.”

Chiara Dynys: Love Hate. Vote Code: 56956

Chiara Dynys: Love Hate. Vote Code: 56956

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning lives and works in Somerset, England. On graduating, she worked for the sculptor Elizabeth Frink. She has been awarded the Landscape Inst Award twice, Civic Trust and Red Rose award, for commissions. Her work is made in series, developed around ideas which start poems. These thoughts are usually derived by medical information, psychological studies, and a fascination with future society.

Lucy Glendinning: Feather Child 1. Vote Code: 56788

Lucy Glendinning: Feather Child 1. Vote Code: 56788

David Henderson

Born in 1956, David Henderson studied art with William Tucker, George Sugarman, and Vito Acconci. He received his M.F.A. from Columbia University in 1981 and his B.A. from Bard College in 1978. He lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He has pioneered the use of fiberglass and carbon fiber as structural materials in sculpture, exploiting the extraordinary tensile strength of these materials in ways usually associated with ultralight aircraft and sailboats, in order to achieve truly unique and astonishing results.

David Henderson: Corby 3. Vote Code: 57205

David Henderson: Corby 3. Vote Code: 57205