#5womenartists – Kiki Smith

During Women’s History Month this March, we are joining the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) in Washington, D.C. by using the hashtag #5womenartists to share important contributions by women in our collection.

The National Museum of Women in the Arts, the world’s only major museum solely dedicated to celebrating the creative contributions of women, champions women through the arts by collecting, exhibiting, researching, and creating programs that advocate for equity and shine a light on excellence. On a daily basis, the museum’s social media platforms highlight women’s contributions to the history of art.

Follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and bookmark their wonderful Broad Strokes Blog.

This week, we feature the work of Kiki Smith.

Most of Kiki Smith’s sculpture is figurative and implies a narrative. She creates a variety of work including drawings and prints but is most well-known for her sculpture. Works like Sleepwalker, shown below, frequently focus on a stylized female figure engaged in slow-moving activity that seems to express a dream-like or visionary image. Although the dark, rich patina is not typical for the artist, it encourages the nocturnal theme of this sculpture.

Smith is the daughter of American sculptor Tony Smith, who helped influence her career by having her assist in making cardboard models for his geometric sculptures. His work is also included in our permanent collection.

Smith was recently honored along with Bernar Venet as a 2016 International Sculpture Center‘s Lifetime Achievement Award winner.

Can you name 5 women artists in our collection?

About NMWA:
The National Museum of Women in the Arts, the world’s only major museum solely dedicated to celebrating the creative contributions of women, champions women through the arts by collecting, exhibiting, researching, and creating programs that advocate for equity and shine a light on excellence. On a daily basis, the museum’s social media platforms highlight women’s contributions to the history of art.

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