#5womenartists – Beverly Pepper

During Women’s History Month this March, we are joining the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) in Washington, D.C. by using the hashtag #5womenartists to share important contributions by women in our collection.

The National Museum of Women in the Arts, the world’s only major museum solely dedicated to celebrating the creative contributions of women, champions women through the arts by collecting, exhibiting, researching, and creating programs that advocate for equity and shine a light on excellence. On a daily basis, the museum’s social media platforms highlight women’s contributions to the history of art.

Follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and bookmark their wonderful Broad Strokes Blog.

This week, we feature the work of Beverly Pepper. Pepper established her career in the wake of Abstract Expressionism in the late 1960s. She began making wedge and columnar sculptures more than 30 years ago feeling that such iconic forms express both a sense of the ancient and modern. A wedge is a piece of wood or metal used as a tool; thick at one end and tapered on the other; it is highly sculptural in design. In Pepper’s work, scale has been greatly exploited to create a sleek sense of force and momentum that marks a sense of place and clearly stands out against the sky.

Beverly Pepper has been a major force across the international scene since the 1960s. A 2012 exhibition at Meijer Gardens focused exclusively on her pioneering efforts in metal beginning with her debut at the famed Spoleto exhibition in 1962 through major recent efforts. Charting her innovation and determination, iconic works from across her repertoire were on view. This was the first major presentation on Pepper in recent years and the first to explore the power and vision of her work in steel. From daring, welded steel of the early 1960s, to pristine geometric works of the late 1960s and 1970s, to the upright sentinels known in public and private collections around the world, the exhibition carried through to ascending monoliths of recent years. This exhibition was accompanied by archival information and a fully illustrated catalogue. Charting her innovation and determination, iconic works from across her repertoire were on view.

 

Can you name 5 women artists in our collection?

About NMWA:
The National Museum of Women in the Arts, the world’s only major museum solely dedicated to celebrating the creative contributions of women, champions women through the arts by collecting, exhibiting, researching, and creating programs that advocate for equity and shine a light on excellence. On a daily basis, the museum’s social media platforms highlight women’s contributions to the history of art.

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