Achieve Beautiful Gardens – March 26 Gardening Mini-Series

By Julie Francke, Curator of Horticulture Education
PART II OF A THREE PART SERIES

IMG_9491_BlogII

“Garden Design: Composition in the Garden”

On March 26, Meijer Gardens’ Spring Gardening Mini-Series will reveal ways to make your garden more beautiful!

We’ll begin with “Garden Design: Composition in the Garden” from 4–5:15 p.m., taught by Chris Major, landscape designer with Blue Ridge Landscaping. Chris will help reexamine your garden through a garden designer’s eyes and inspire you with great plant combinations. More importantly, he’ll reveal why these combinations look great and how to apply these principles to your garden. Chris will also reveal how hardscapes (anything that is not a plant) can help tie the overall garden design together.

When asked, “What is the most common mistake people make when designing their gardens?” Chris revealed it is not paying enough attention to the scale.

“When selecting hardscapes, such as boulders, sculptures and walkways, we need to select materials with respect to the scale of their outdoor environment—this is generally larger than the homeowner realizes.”

In regards to plants, scale is equally as important. Understanding a plant’s growth habit and rate need to be taken into consideration. “We’ve all seen the cute spruce trees at the garden center and proceeded to plant them a few feet from the corner of the house. At first, this makes sense because that little guy would look ridiculous if you planted it 15 or 18 feet away. Unfortunately, the end of this story usually involves a landscaper having to remove said tree 15 years later as it is now attacking the side of the home!”

"Perennials: The Power of One"

“Perennials: The Power of One”

If you are searching for the “best of the best” perennials for your West Michigan garden, you won’t want to miss “Perennials: The Power of One” from 5:30–6:45 p.m. presented by Susan Martin, perennial specialist and director of marketing communications for Walters Gardens. Susan is passionate about perennials and writes about them in the Walters Gardens catalog, on websites, in industry publications and Michigan Gardening Magazine. With more than 1,000 perennials growing in display and trial gardens right outside her office door, she sees first-hand how they perform.

Susan’s profession is also her hobby—she describes her own garden as a “collector’s garden” that includes a broad mix of perennials, annuals, shrubs and vines. In this class, Susan will reveal some incredibly improved perennials including:

  • A series of Tickseed (Coreopsis) that blooms for 5 months non-stop
  • A hardy perennial with dinner plate-sized blossoms that will be center of attention for a full three months in the garden
  • A shasta daisy (Leucanthemum) that puts out four rounds of flowers from early summer into mid-fall
  • A tall garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) that never gets powdery mildew
  • A tall stonecrop (Sedum) with stems so strong you’ll have to cut them down in spring–it never flops!

According to Susan, “To find out which varieties they are, you’ll have to attend my talk!”

“Drought Tolerant Landscapes”

“Drought Tolerant Landscapes”

In “Drought Tolerant Landscapes” from 7–8:15 p.m., Richard Sierra, senior sales representative for Hortech, will reveal ways you can help your garden thrive despite our hotter and drier summers and suggest plants that thrive on less water.

According to Richard, Hortech has seen an increasing demand for plants that require less water and maintenance. Gardeners are changing the way they think about water and are becoming more aware of water as an important resource—both from an environmental standpoint as well as financial. Last summer, some Midwestern cities even experienced water restrictions and bans.

Richard came into the green industry by accident—24 years ago he began working as a team leader in the shipping department and later became certified as a Green Industry Professional—and now advises landscapers and garden centers across the Midwest on the best plants for their needs. He also landscaped his first home in Grand Haven entirely with groundcovers and rocks; a low-growing sedum was his lawn, surrounded by drought-tolerant ornamental grasses, and punctuated by boulders.  Richard’s garden only needed to be irrigated during periods of extreme drought, saving time, money, and the important water resource.

All classes in the Spring Gardening Mini-Series are offered at the affordable price of $10 for members and $15 for non-members thanks to the support of the Association of Grand Rapids Landscape Professionals.

Click here to register for any of these classes, as well as classes held on April 9 and April 11. Full descriptions and other information are also included. Walk-ins welcome.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s